Get off my lawn

I feel increasingly tired and cranky about women’s hockey and how it is covered and how people who do not watch regularly talk about it.

First, we get it:  fans, mostly men, who don’t watch women’s hockey think it isn’t good enough or fast enough and that the lack of hitting and fighting is a drawback.  (Uh, type usa canada women 2013 into your search bar and look what comes up.  I like that there is less hitting and fighting and more actual game play, but tastes vary.)  And you tell us that at every opportunity.  Frankly, we are aware that you think that way, and yours isn’t the interest we are seeking.  Go watch Don Cherry re-runs.  Women’s hockey is not a carbon copy of men’s hockey, and complaining because it isn’t is a waste of time and breath.

On that same note, please stop saying that the women want a hand out and don’t deserve it.  The NHL and its predecessors were money losers for decades.  You know who gave them money?  Tax payers did.  (Link via David Berri.) So stop saying women are asking for special treatment; they are asking for equal treatment, the same hand out that the NHL got.

Second:  the mainstream* coverage of the PWHPA lacks any sort criticism; nothing they say is interrogated in a meaningful way.  The loudest PWHPA speakers have been racist jerks; former players with axes to grind; and current national team players who come across as petty grudge-holders.  HockeyNight’s coverage last night included blatantly inaccurate statements about the NWHL, and framed the PWHPA as a union (which it is not) engaged in a boycott (which this is also not).

*They are happy to talk to big men’s hockey outlets and national reporters who don’t actually know the nitty gritty of woho, but based on the woho media I follow, they ignore pretty much everyone else and fail to provide even basic press information.  (That was a criticism of the NWHL early on too, but they learned from it and are much improved.  People forget that the league is five years old.  That’s an infant in professional sports league terms.)

Third:  the big voices on social media for the PWHPA may be standing up for national team players, but it isn’t really clear to me as an observer that they are doing shit for the lower tier players…who are getting a change to play in the NWHL since there is space now.

As a fan, would I love for professional women’s hockey to pay a living wage?  Yes.  Would I buy tickets, merch, pay to stream games?  Yes.  The PWHPA has not made any of these opportunities available to me.  You know who has?  The NWHL.  So I’m going to continue buying tickets and merch and streaming the NWHL games (which are free on Twitch).  And I’m going to continue to side eye everyone who claims that there is no women’s hockey league in North America.  There is; it’s just not the one players claiming they wanted #OneLeague actually wanted to survive the CWHL/NWHL competition.

The PWHPA seems to be hoping the NWHL will just go away (or be put out of business by the NHL), which is kind of pathetic and short-sighted, IMO.  Boston and Minnesota have sold out their games this season; the league has added another investor and multiple sponsors; they are sharing revenue with players.  It also seems naive to me:  why do you think a women’s league operated by Bettman et al. would be good for women?  Do you think they’ll handle CTE differently for women?  Do you think they’ll release players for the Olympics or Nationals?  That seems unlikely.

Ugh.  Get off my lawn.  I’ve got a Riveters game to go to.

Leave a comment

Filed under miscellanea, Uncategorized

😒

I had not paid any attention to the publication of American Dirt. I saw it described as a modern day Grapes of Wrath and was kind of meh. I mean, I read the Joads’ story in high school. The cover’s birds and barb wire made me think of farming. (I grew up in a rural pocket on the east coast’s midatlantic region: barb wire fencing was as common as electric fencing.). Learning that the book is a Latinx narrative about immigration written by a white person for a huge advance? Uh, nope. How did no one from the writer to the editor to the publisher to the art department to anyone even tangentially involved not ask even once, is this a good idea? 😬

3 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Addendum to 2019 reading

Finished Gideon the Ninth.  It took several tries to get past the first 50 pages or so, but then it was an engrossing read.  Having finished, I feel ambivalent.  It was very well written, with excellent world building.  And I didn’t see the end coming until just before it happened.  The ending is what I’m ambivalent about, but I can’t really explain why without spoilers.  Enough to say that I wish I had read the ending first, because my mindset about the whole book and characters would have been somewhat different.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book related

Year end summary for 2019

According to LibraryThing, I read 45 books.  I have three still in progress that I started in the last month or so, but am likely only to maybe finish one (Gideon the Ninth).  Several were the Sean Kennedy Micah Johnston novellas, which I liked fairly well.  The highest rated books were City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty, which I loved (although I felt kind of meh about the second book of the trilogy); Knife Children by L.M. Bujold; and Jane Doe by Victoria Helen Stone.  Honorable mentions to Alderman’s The Power and Sujata Massey’s The Satapur Moonstone; and Aaronovitch’s German Peter Grant offshoot, The October Man.

Theater and film:  Just film this past year, plus one opera.

  • The Magic Flute – loved the scenery, which was done by Maurice Sendak
  • The Favourite
  • Captain Marvel
  • Rocketman
  • Men in Black
  • Avengers: Endgame
  • The Hustle
  • Downton Abbey
  • Terminator: Dark Fate
  • A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

Travel

  • Phoenix
  • Las Vegas
  • Dallas
  • Boston
  • Terceira (Azores)
  • Houston
  • Pittsburgh

NWHL – all the Riveters’ home games for the end of the 2018-2019, including the home playoff game.  The home 2019-20 games (only a couple so far).

NHL – an embarrassing number of games, but no playoffs – was in Terceira during the first round, when my team was swept.  [I was surprised by the sweep but not by the series loss; they were utterly disinterested in playing defense all season, and it caught up with them in the playoffs.]  Went to games in Pittsburgh, Phoenix, and Las Vegas.  Was in Boston during playoffs but not when Boston was playing at home, so TD Garden is still on my list of venues to visit.

For baseball, there were just two games:  Detroit and Rays.  The Orioles were SO BAD.  It was painful.  And it was absolutely reflected in attendance.  Weekend game, gorgeous weather, maybe 10,000 fans in seats at the most.

Museums and cultural events:  the Walters, the Heinz, Fallingwater, Polymath Park, loved the Phipps Conservatory, many lovely chapels on Terceira, the MFA in Boston, the Isabella Gardiner Stewart Museum (favorite).  Enjoyed both the Phoenix Art Museum and the Heard Museum, adored the Lego art exhibition at the science museum in Dallas.  Went to the Dallas Book Depository because it was very highly recommended.  It was fine?  I mean, I’m glad I went, but it didn’t really speak to me.  Kinda meh about the Mob Museum in Las Vegas, which felt kind of rah rah about law enforcement.

Music – to Boston for Lost Evenings III, four nights of shows at HOB with Frank Turner, all with different themes, opening acts, and set lists.  Heard “Balthasar Impresario” live, so all my FT boxes have been checked.  Also saw FT and the Sleeping Souls at the Warner Theater for the No Man’s Land tour, which was different – a venue with seats – and a little weird.  The music was good but it was literally the first time I went to a non-general admission FT show and sat the whole time.  Loved “Kassiani” and “The Lioness” live.

Professionally speaking, eh, I’m doing things I’m not really interested in or trained to do: I’m a lawyer by training, not a technology project manager or a contract manager.  This is not the best deployment of my skills.  But I do what my director wants done.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book related, miscellanea, movies, Read or seen

More recent-ish reading

My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers Her Family’s Nazi Past by Jennifer Teege – translated from German, 2016, was a book found on a shelf over Thx.  Written by the granddaughter of Amon Goeth, about discovering who her grandfather was and reconciling it with her Israeli friends, her somewhat vague memories of her grandmother (Goeth’s lover), and her existence/life as a woman of color.  Interesting, especially in terms of how her reconciliation includes discussion of how generations of Germans have dealt (or not) with family members who were active in the Nazi party or passively complicit.  I struggled, though, with the narrator’s descriptions of her attempts to establish contact with her mother, who had put her up for adoption and did not really seem interested in a relationship.

Aftertaste:  A Novel in Five Courses by Meredith Mileti.  Liked seeing glimpses of Pittsburgh in fiction, even if Bruno’s was a *very* thinly veiled Enrico Biscotti Co. Didn’t find the narrator particularly sympathetic or compelling. Readers are told that she was fiery and successful and had a temper, not really shown that. Extremely predictable.

Watcher in the Woods by Kelley Armstrong.  It was fine? I’ve already forgotten the plot.

Tried reading Beartown by Fredrik Backman, but the narrative style didn’t suit me.  A reader whose taste I trust recommended Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir, which I’ve borrowed from the library, but I haven’t managed to get past the first 50 pages and keep putting it back down; there’s nothing wrong with it, it’s just not grabbing me.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book related

September reading

More library books!  Mostly checked out when I visited the Grand Reopening, which included a block party with deejay and music, dance performances, speakers/readings, and more people in the library than I have ever seen.

Wherever She Goes by Kelley Armstrong.  I first started reading Armstrong’s paranormal/urban fantasy books, back before werewolves were popular in SFF/UF/romance, and gradually stopped reading them when other magic stuff was involved.  But every so often she publishes a stand alone or short series with a female protagonist that isn’t paranormal/UF, and I usually check them out.  This one was kind of unimpressive, mostly because I thought the narrator was not as smart as she thought she was.  Also, as I get older, I find mysteries as fantasies of justice wrought by police or by civilian vigilantes less and less palatable.  It wasn’t terrible, but I would probably not go out of my way to read another book with this narrator.

The Orphans of Raspay by Lois McMaster Bujold.  Another Penric and Desdemona novella.  Pleasant read in the Five Gods world, which I like very much.  The pacing was a little uneven, but still worth the time and waiting through the hold list for ebooks at the library.

Small Change (Vol 1) by Roan Parrish.  This was a free Kindle recd by someone on Twitter. Liked the bi narrator, but ultimately felt like she was a spoiled twit. I’m so non-standard, my family is so terrible, blah blah blah. She had the traditional tortured, uncommunicative hero role; it didn’t work any better for me with gender roles flipped. Felt like the hero deserved better, much as I generally feel like the heroines deserve better than the emotionally constipated heroes they get in traditional romance.

The Third Mrs. Durst by Ann Aguirre.  Liked this very much.  Although I guessed the twist early on, it was well done and kept me reading to get to the end for the wrap up.

Arsenic with Austen by Katherine Bolger Hyde.  Meh.  Did it want to be a cozy mystery or a social commentary a la Austen?  Kind of failed at both.  The writing style was fairly old fashioned and full of telling rather than showing, with a pretty predictable whodunit.  The narrator’s voice was not particularly distinctive, with a Big Secret that was hinted around but ultimately predictable.  (I think I was supposed to find her sympathetic but mostly she just struck me as pathetic.)  There’s a second book out in this mystery series, but I won’t be borrowing it from the library.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book related

Summer reading list

I’ve managed to do a fair amount of reading this summer, primarily because the library’s renovation ended, making the stacks accessible again!

Non-fiction

Sargent’s Daughters: The Biography of a Painting, and Sargent’s Women: Four Lives Behind the Canvas – there are a lot of books about the lives of the people he painted, but it seems like there are fewer biographies of Sargent himself.

Fiction

Sean Kennedy’s GetOut novellas – nice to revisit characters from the Tigers & Devils books, Young Adult-ish.

Two new(ish?) Aurora Teagarden mysteries by Charlaine Harris.  They were easy reads, although I’m not sure I would have cared for them if they had been published close to when she first wrote the series.

The last two CS Harris mysteries – these, like the Teagarden mysteries, are like cotton candy – essentially gone/forgotten immediately, although I do like the main characters better here.  (I find Roe Teagarden to be reminiscent of a lot of small town “nice ladies” in a very unflattering to her way.)

The Widows of Malabar Hill and The Satapur Moonstone by Sujata Massey – mysteries set in early 20th century India with an Indian woman who is a lawyer as narrator.  Very well done, felt atmospheric, although I do not know enough about Indian history or culture to be an accurate judge.

Unmarriageable by Soniah Kamal – modern adaptation of Pride and Prejudice set in Pakistan.  Enjoyed this a lot, although I found the modern version of Lydia and Wickham to be OTT.  I’m not sure if that is because their shallowness/selfishness was worse in a modern setting or what.

Under Currents by Nora Roberts.  Her voice/style is still appealing.  And yet.  This book felt recycled and poorly edited.  It was kind of episodic, with clunky pacing and cardboard bad guys, and just straight up had factual errors about things like the medical and legal professions that could have been corrected with a minimum of research.  Also: I get that NR loves gardening/landscaping, but it’s not really engrossing to read about for people who do not.

 

2 Comments

Filed under Book related